Breaking the Huddle


2010 Random Baseball Statistics
September 28, 2010, 8:38 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

(all of the following statistics are through Monday’s games)

Toronto’s hit more home runs on the road than 12 teams have hit TOTAL.

Roy Halladay has more complete games, by himself, than the entire pitching staffs of 24 other teams.

Tampa Bay has more stolen bases than San Francisco, Toronto and the Chicago Cubs combined.

The Chicago White Sox have been caught stealing nearly as many times (73) as the Boston Red Sox attempted to steal (77).

The Arizona Diamondbacks have more strikeouts at the plate (1,458) than hits (1,327) this season.

The San Francisco Giants have more strikeouts on the mound (1,269) than hits allowed (1,235).

In 348 plate appearances before being lost for the season, Justin Morneau reached first base 152 times.

In 489 plate appearances over the whole season, Rangers OFJeff Franceour has reached 148 times.

Carlos Marmol has 133 strikeouts in 74 innings pitched, and if he finishes strong, he’ll be the first pitcher to average 16 K’s/9 IP in major league history.

Pirates Woes, Historically Speaking: Despite completing their 18th consecutive losing season in 2010, the Pittsburgh Pirates, as a Franchise, are still over the .500 mark (.503 to be exact). However:

-At the end of the 1992 season, in which the Pirates lost in the NLCS for the third consecutive year. Their franchise record was 8587-8222, good enough for a .511 winning percentage. This was the seventh best all-time, behind only powerhouse franchises such as the Yankees, Red Sox, Dodgers, Cubs, Giants and Cardinals. In addition to their stellar beginning to the 90s, the Pirates organization dominated the baseball landscape in the 70s (their worst mark for a season was 80-82; they made the postseason six times and won the World Series in ’71 and ’79). Pittsburgh had also taken home the hardware in 1960, giving them three titles in 20 seasons, a feat matched only by the Yankees (a few times), the Athletics in the 70s, the Orioles (64-83) and the Dodgers (63-82)since expansion era began in 1960. The point is, Pittsburgh has enough history to make the case that they are one of the most iconic franchises in baseball history.

The mismanagement and lack of direction over the past 18 years has been staggering. The real shot to the gut (as if the past 18 years hasn’t been enough) could come late in 2013. Should the Pirates average just 59 wins over the next three seasons (not an unreasonable approximation, as they’ve averaged just 62 over the past three) they will fall below .500 as a franchise. Not that this is anything particularly earth-shattering, but it is interesting (and mathematically preposterous) that this once noble organization could suffer 21 seasons of losing baseball to put them under the .500 mark for the franchise’s history, which extends all the way back to 1882.

 The average age of the Philadelphia batters this season was  31.9, which lead all of baseball. The average of the pitchers they used was  31.2, which also lead all of baseball.

Despite their insistence that this season is a “rebuilding year”, the Houston Astros have (on average) the fifth-oldest group of pitchers in baseball and the eighth oldest group of position players.

This is random, but I had to throw it out there… anyone really miss the steroids era? In 2001, the Texas Rangers led the league by hitting 246 home runs. More fascinating than that? They gave at least 15 starts to four different pitchers who finished the season with ERAs over 6.00.

Speaking of the steroid era, I think I’ll close with a fun game called “See if You Can Spot the Season this Marginal Player Hit the Tar Out of the Ball Despite Showing No Prior Ability to Do So at Such High a Level.” I know, I need to work on the title of the game, but here you go!

Enjoy!

Pick the year the guy was on steroids:

Brady Anderson:

YR     TEAM  G  AB  R    H 2B 3B HR RBI TB  BB  SO SB CS  OBP  SLG  AVG

1993   Bal 142 560  87 147 36  8 13  66 238 82  99 24 12 .363 .425 .263

1994   Bal 111 453  78 119 25  5 12  48 190 57  75 31  1 .356 .419 .263

1995   Bal 143 554 108 145 33 10 16  64 246 87 111 26  7 .371 .444 .262

1996   Bal 149 579 117 172 37  5 50 110 369 76 106 21  8 .396 .637 .297

1997   Bal 151 590  97 170 39  7 18  73 277 84 105 18 12 .393 .469 .288

1998   Bal 133 479  84 113 28  3 18  51 201 75  78 21  7 .356 .420 .236

Adrian Beltre:

YR     TEAM  G  AB  R    H 2B 3B HR RBI TB  BB  SO SB CS  OBP  SLG  AVG

2001   LA  126 475  59 126 22  4 13  60 195 28  82 13 4 .310 .411 .265

2002   LA  159 587  70 151 26  5 21  75 250 37  96  7 5 .303 .426 .257

2003   LA  158 559  50 134 30  2 23  80 237 37 103  2 2 .290 .424 .240

2004   LA  156 598 104 200 32  0 48 121 376 53  87  7 2 .388 .629 .334

2005   SEA 156 603  69 154 36  1 19  87 249 38 108  3 1 .303 .413 .255

Todd Hundley:

SEA    TEAM  G AB   R  H 2B 3B HR RBI  TB BB  SO SBCS OBP  SLG  AVG

1993   NYM 130 417 40  95 17 2 11  53 149 23  62 1 1 .269 .357 .228

1994   NYM  91 291 45  69 10 1 16  42 129 25  73 2 1 .303 .443 .237

1995   NYM  90 275 39  77 11 0 15  51 133 42  64 1 0 .382 .484 .280

1996   NYM 153 540 85 140 32 1 41 112 297 79 146 1 3 .356 .550 .259

1997   NYM 132 417 78 114 21 2 30  86 229 83 116 2 3 .394 .549 .273

1998   NYM  53 124  8  20  4 0  3  12  33 16  55 1 1 .261 .266 .161

Richard Hidalgo:

SEA    TEAM  G AB    R  H  2B3B HR RBI  TB BB  SO SBCS  OBP  SLG  AVG

1998   HOU  74 211  31  64 15 0  7  35 100 17  37  3 3 .355 .474 .303

1999   HOU 108 383  49  87 25 2 15  56 161 56  73  8 5 .328 .420 .227

2000   HOU 153 558 118 175 42 3 44 122 355 56 110 13 6 .391 .636 .314

2001   HOU 146 512  70 141 29 3 19  80 233 54 107  3 5 .356 .455 .275

2002   HOU 114 388  54  91 17 4 15  48 161 43  85  6 2 .319 .415 .235

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